Faqs

(Q) Why Should I Choose Genesis Home Inspections?
(A) The purchase of a new home is one of the largest investments a family can make. Getting a new home inspection allows the buyer to receive an unbiased, professional opinion to help determine the current condition of the house. An inspection will help foresee any immediate conditions that need to be addressed and touch on areas that could become a problem in the future. This helps save money both immediately and in the future while also helping greatly with any settlement negotiations.

(Q) How Long Will The Inspection Take?
(A) Most inspections take an average of 2-4 hours depending on the home size or things being inspected, not including the time needed to prepare a report. The time can vary based on the size and condition of the property. Attics and crawl spaces must be accessible or we won’t be able to access these areas.

(Q) When My Bank Is Having The House Appraised, Should I Still Have The Home Inspected?
(A) Absolutely! The bank’s appraisal is an independent evaluation of the current market value of the property. The appraiser works for the bank while we work for you, helping you save time and money with a realistic unbiased inspection of your property’s current condition.

(Q) Does A Brand New House Need An Inspection?
(A) Absolutely! Most builders try to provide a high quality house, but they have to balance that with staying competitive. For builders, it often comes down to ‘survival of the cheapest’. Much work is done by sub-contractors. A construction boom in recent years has caused a shortage of skilled labor. Coordinating schedules between different trades is a juggling act. New products are constantly being introduced into the market adding even more confusion.

Municipal inspectors try to do a good job but they’re vastly overworked, often looking at dozens of houses each day. A thorough home inspection takes hours, not minutes. Municipal inspectors simply don’t have the manpower to find all the construction defects.

(Q) How Much Does A Home Inspection Cost?
(A) The inspection fee for a typical one-family house varies geographically, as does the cost of housing. Similarly, within a given area, the inspection fee may vary depending on a number of factors such as the size of the house, its age and possible optional services such as septic, well or radon testing.

Do not let cost be a factor in deciding whether or not to have a home inspection or in the selection of your home inspector. The sense of security and knowledge gained from an inspection is well worth the cost, and the lowest-priced inspection is not necessarily a bargain. Use the inspector’s qualifications, training, compliance with your state’s regulations, if any, and professional affiliations as a guide.

(Q) Why Do Some Of Your Competitors Cost Less?
(A) All home inspectors are not equal. You only have one chance to get a good home inspection. You don’t want cheap — you want the best home inspection possible! Saving a few bucks by using a bargain-priced home inspector could cost you thousands of dollars in repair costs in the long run.

(Q) Can a House Fail a Home Inspection?
(A) No. A professional home inspection is an examination of the current condition of a house. It is not an appraisal, which determines market value. It is not a municipal inspection, which verifies local code compliance. A home inspector, therefore, will not pass or fail a house, but rather describe its physical condition and indicate what components and systems may need major repair or replacement.

(Q) What Does a Home Inspection Include?
(A) The standard home inspector’s report will cover the condition of the home’s heating system; central air conditioning system (temperature permitting); interior plumbing and electrical systems; the roof, attic and visible insulation; walls, ceilings, floors, windows and doors; the foundation, basement and structural components.
The International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI) publishes a Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics that outlines what you should expect to be covered in your home inspection report.

(Q) May I Attend The Inspection?
(A) We invite you to be present during the inspection, though it’s not necessary. Your presence gives you the opportunity to see what our inspector is noting and the chance to ask any questions you may have. We know this is not possible for many people due to time constraints, so rest assured that we will provide you with a very detailed report whether you’re present or not.

(Q) When Should I Call To Schedule The Inspection?
(A) As soon as possible after you have a signed purchase contract. We’re often scheduled a week or more in advance, so make sure that your purchase contract has plenty of time for you to get repair estimates for major problems that may show up during the inspection.

For newly constructed homes, schedule the inspection a few days before your walk-through with the builder so that you’ll have our written report in your hands during the walk-through. You should schedule warranty inspections at least a month before your warranty expires.

(Q) How Do I Prepare For The Inspection?
(A) Preparing for the inspection is easy. Be ready to follow us around the home. You may want to bring a notepad and pen to take notes. All deficiencies are listed on our reports but there are some maintenance items (i.e. like when to change a furnace filter) that will not be on the inspection report.

(Q) When Will The Report Be Ready?
(A) Right on the spot! All reports are done through a software on our iPads or iPhones. At the end of the inspection, the inspector sends you a digital copy of your report via email. Ready for you in seconds!

(Q) ​If the house proves to be in good condition, did I really need an inspection?
(A) Definitely. Now you can complete your home purchase with confidence. You’ll have learned many things about your new home from the inspector’s written report, and will have that information for future reference.

(Q) What If The Inspection Reveals Problems?
(A) No house is perfect. If the inspector identifies problems, it doesn’t mean you should or shouldn’t buy the house, only that you will know in advance what to expect. If your budget is tight, or if you don’t want to become involved in future repair work, this information will be important to you. If major problems are found, a seller may agree to make repairs.

(Q) Who Gets a Copy of my Report?
(A) The report is yours. In the pre-inspection agreement there will be a box to check which asks if you would like the report to be made public (copies sent to agent, mortgage lender, etc.) or decline and have a copy sent to you only.

(Q) Are There Limitations To The Inspection?
(A) Yes, we can’t see through walls or predict the future! If we could do either of those, we’d be in another line of work earning a lot more money. Keep in mind that a home inspection lasts only a few hours, and it’s not technically exhaustive. A home inspection is not an appraisal or a check for compliance with building codes and it’s not an evaluation for any biological or environmental hazards.

(Q) Do You Offer A Guarantee?
(A) No. Something can look and operate just fine today and still break tomorrow. We do our best to give you the most thorough inspection possible. If you want a home warranty they are available through other sources. Review the warranty carefully to determine what the warranty covers.

(Q) What If I Have Questions Later?
(A) Your understanding of the home is my highest priority. You can ask questions for as long as you own your home.

 

Forms of payment the Genesis Home Inspections accepts include:
All major credit cards and cash payments.